Protected Concerted Activity Section 7

The phrase "Protected Concerted Activity" refers to certain protected activities specified in the National Labor Relations Act of 1935. Under the NLRA, covered employees may join together to improve... more +
The phrase "Protected Concerted Activity" refers to certain protected activities specified in the National Labor Relations Act of 1935. Under the NLRA, covered employees may join together to improve their wages and working conditions. If employees are engaged in "protected concerted activity" and suffer adverse employment consequences, such employees may seek redress under the NLRA, whether or not they are members of a union.  less -
News & Analysis as of

Social Media Policy Cannot Prevent Employee from Negative Responses to Customer Tweets

The National Labor Relations Board continues to interpret Section 7 of the NLRA to prevent employers from adopting social media policies that restrict employees’ ability to publically complain about their terms and conditions...more

NLRA Protections for Derogatory Statements and Four-Letter Words Attacking a Company and its Managers

More and more employers, union and non-union alike, are getting ensnared in efforts by the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB or “Board”) to aggressively expand employee rights under the National Labor Relations Act...more

Restaurant Forced to Rehire Employees Who Insinuated Food was Germ-Infested - Section 7 of the NLRA Guarantees Workers the Right...

The Jimmy John's sandwich franchise must have been surprised to learn that it had violated federal labor law when it disciplined employees who had posted hundreds of signs around its outlets suggesting that its sandwiches...more

#Concerted Activity in 140 Characters or Less

Employees have increasingly voiced concerns on social media regarding their employment, often including specific statements about their employers. As previously discussed on this blog, an employee’s Facebook post related to...more

NLRB Says Employers Cannot Stop Employees From Recording Conversations In Meetings

On December 24, 2015, employees who want to make video and audio recordings of co-workers and company meetings received a holiday gift. In Whole Foods Inc. and United Food and Commercial Workers, Local 919, the National...more

Labor Smart 101 - What Employers Need to Know about the NLRA

Objectives - - Familiarize yourself with the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”) - Recognize prohibitions of the NLRA - Discern Rights of Employers and Employees - Identify Impact -...more

NLRB Holds That a Ban on Videotaping Workplace Conversations is Unlawful

Recently, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) held that an employer violated Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) by maintaining a policy that prohibited employees from making certain audio or video...more

NLRB Invalidates Another Employer Conduct Policy

On December 24, 2015, in Whole Foods Market, Inc., 363 NLRB No. 87 (2015) (Whole Foods), the National Labor Relations Board (Board) invalidated two Whole Foods Market policies that prohibited employees' use of recording...more

Second Circuit Holds That Facebook “Like” May Be Concerted Activity Under Section 7 of the NLRA

The Second Circuit recently released a summary order in Three D, LLC v. NLRB affirming the National Labor Relations Board’s (the Board) ruling that a Facebook “like” can be construed as concerted activity under Section 7 of...more

The Second Circuit “Likes” the NLRB’s Reasoning

In recent years, the National Labor Relations Board has tended to protect employees’ social media activity against employers. A few weeks ago, the Second Circuit upheld a decision of the National Labor Relations Board...more

D.C. Circuit Upholds NLRB Ban on Various Employee Handbook Policies

As exhaustively reported in EmployNews over the past several years, the National Labor Relations Board has been attacking numerous employee handbook provisions considered for years by employers to constitute standard...more

Second Circuit Affirms NLRB Decision Employers Won’t Like

Back in August 2014, we discussed an NLRB decision, which concluded that employees’ use of Facebook’s “like” button can constitute protected concerted activity under Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act and that the...more

Facebook ‘like’ considered protected activity

Employers know that when it comes to employees discussing employment issues on social media, it is best for employers to tread carefully. A recent federal court of appeals decision confirmed that even a simple Facebook “like”...more

Quirky Question #269: Like it or Not – Facebook Post Protected Under the NLRA

Question: I own a small manufacturing company that employs 25-35 employees, depending on our workload. Over the years, a number of my customers and my employees have “friended” me on Facebook. Last week, I saw that one of...more

Second Circuit Upholds NLRB’s Views on Employee Social Media Use

Last year, the National Labor Relations Board held for the first time that “liking” a comment on a Facebook page may qualify as protected activity if it relates to comments that are otherwise protected under Section 7 of the...more

Second Circuit Affirms NLRB View That Facebook "Likes" Are Protected Concerted Activity

Last week, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals backed the National Labor Relations Board’s position that employee social media postings are protected concerted activity under federal law, even if they use obscenities that...more

Second Circuit Sides With NLRB In Facebook Dispute

As employees continue to flock to social media in droves, employers have been craving additional guidance about how, if at all, they can regulate work-related posts. While it is no secret that employees in unionized and...more

Dislike Employees’ Facebook “Likes”? Fire Away at Your Own Risk

On October 21, 2015, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the ruling of the National Labor Relations Board (“Board”) decision in Triple Play Sports Bar and Grill, 361 NLRB No. 31 (2014). The employer, Triple Play, had...more

Second Circuit Finds Facebook “Likes” Protected Under NLRA

On October 21, 2015, the Second Circuit clarified in Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille v. National Labor Relations Board that protections provided under Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”) encompass...more

Second Circuit Upholds That Facebook "Likes" Can Be Protected, Concerted Activity

On October 21, 2015, the Second Circuit upheld the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) earlier ruling that clicking the Facebook “Like” button can be protected concerted activity. The Triple Play Sports Bar & Grill fired...more

NLRB: A Sole Employee Filing a Class Action Lawsuit is Protected Concerted Activity

The National Labor Relations Board’s (“NLRB”) definition of the word “concerted” is beginning to extend past its common sense meaning. The NLRB has been expanding what counts as “concerted” activity under Section 7 of the...more

Employer Strikes Out; Facebook Likes Protected by NLRA, Says Second Circuit

On Friday, at my firm’s annual Labor & Employment Law seminar, I’ll be talking about the NLRB and Employee Handbooks with my colleague, Chris Engler. Among the topics we had planned to discuss was the ongoing Triple Play...more

NLRB Says Employee Protest of Government Action is Protected Concerted Activity

Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act protects employees’ rights to engage in “concerted activity.” Concerted activity means persons acting on behalf of two or more employees with regard to issues involving terms and...more

Concerted Activity or Insubordination?

With its recent decision in Central States SE and SW Areas, Health & Welfare and Pension Funds, 362 N.L.R.B. No. 155, 203 LRRM 2082 (August 4, 2015), the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB” or “Board”) has provided another...more

NLRB Says Filing Class Action Lawsuit is Protected Concerted Activity

Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act prohibits employers from discriminating or retaliating against employees who engage in protected concerted activity. Concerted Activity means actions involving terms and...more

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