Rest and Meal Break Fair Labor Standards Act

News & Analysis as of

Paid Breaks Cannot Offset Overtime Obligations

Neither the federal Fair Labor Standards Act nor wage payment laws in place in most states require that employers provide non-exempt employees with paid meal and other breaks. However, employers commonly offer employees paid...more

Employers Beware – The Third Circuit Strictly Construes the FLSA Regulations to Prevent Taking Credit to Offset Overtime...

As employers prepare to implement the new federal Department of Labor regulations which, on December 1, 2016, will double the minimum salary required for many exemptions under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”), employers...more

Third Circuit Confirms Paid Meal Breaks Cannot Offset FLSA Overtime Liability

In a recent decision, the Third Circuit emphasized the need for employers to capture and compensate all hours worked by non-exempt employees, even if the employer pays the employees for break time that it could treat as...more

Supreme Court Declines Review of D.C. Circuit’s Decision Upholding DOL Home Care Rule as Regulatory and Litigation Focus on Home...

On June 27, 2016, the U.S. Supreme Court denied the plaintiffs’ petition for a writ of certiorari in Home Care Association of America v. Weil, leaving the U.S. Department of Labor’s (“DOL”) Home Care Rule intact. The Home...more

10 Tips to Mitigate or Prevent Wage and Hour Litigation in the Post-Acute Industry

Wage and hour lawsuits are being filed against employers under federal and state wage and hour laws at a record rate. Most wage and hour claims allege the employer failed to pay employees for off-the-clock work, failed to pay...more

Beware Unpaid Rest Breaks for Non-Exempt Employees

A recent federal court decision in Pennsylvania affirmed the risks incurred by employers if they treat brief rest breaks as unpaid for non-exempt employees. In Perez v. American Future Systems, Inc. d/b/a Progressive Business...more

The Third Circuit Adopts Predominant Benefit Test For Meal Periods, Leaving The Ninth Circuit As The Sole Holdout

The Third Circuit Court of Appeals recently joined the chorus of Circuits adopting the pro-employer “predominant benefit test” when weighing the compensability of meal periods under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”). As...more

Third Circuit Decides Two Precedential Employment Cases to Close Out November 2015

Over a span of two weeks at the end of last month, the Third Circuit Court of Appeals issued two key opinions concerning oft-scrutinized areas of employment law — rights attendant to employer-employee relationships and...more

Third Circuit Adopts New Test for Determining Whether Meal Breaks Are Compensable

On November 24, 2015, a divided U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit found that the “predominant benefit” test should be applied when determining whether mealtime breaks constitute compensable time under the Fair Labor...more

Meal Break Win in Third Circuit Gives Employers Reason to Be Thankful for More Than Thanksgiving Meals

Although the turkey (and leftover turkey sandwiches) are all gone, employers within the Third Circuit have reason to extend the Thanksgiving celebration given a recent decision affirming the dismissal of a collective action...more

Recent Prison Guard Case Frees Employers from Meal Period Uncertainty Under the FLSA

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit has provided some certainty to Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware employers as to when employees’ meal breaks can be uncompensated and when they must be paid. In a split...more

When Must Meal Breaks Be Paid? Third Circuit Clarifies FLSA Test

Whether meal breaks count as compensable hours worked for non-exempt employees under the Fair Labor Standards Act can be a thorny issue for employers. The FLSA regulations provide that meal periods during which an employee is...more

Third Circuit: Meal Breaks For Employees' "Predominant Benefit" Are Not Worktime

The Third Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals (with jurisdiction over Delaware, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania) has ruled in Babcock v. Butler County that employees who receive the "predominant benefit" of a meal break are not...more

Third Circuit Adopts Predominant Benefit Test to Determine Compensability of Meal Breaks

The U.S. Third Circuit Court of Appeals, which has jurisdiction over Pennsylvania, recently evaluated the appropriate test to determine when employees must be paid for meal breaks. As described below, the Third Circuit in the...more

Fifth Circuit Rules Employer-Mandated Transit Time May Make Lunch Break Compensable

The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals, which has jurisdiction over Texas, Louisiana and Mississippi, ruled Monday that security guards’ “off-the-clock” meal periods may be compensable when they were required to travel for 10 to...more

Beware State Wage and Hour Laws: Washington Supreme Court Upends Piece Work Calculations

Whenever I discuss federal law here on the blog, I usually add a disclaimer that reminds employers to check state and local laws before proceeding. With the proliferation of minimum wage increases, minding state and local...more

Supreme Court to Revisit Class-Certification Standards in Tyson Foods, Inc. v. Bouaphakeo

Monday, the Supreme Court granted review in what may be a major decision on the standards for class certification, Tyson Foods, Inc. v. Bouaphakeo, No. 14-1146. Under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 23, a court may not...more

Employment Law - May 2015

U.S. Supreme Court Permits Narrow Review of EEOC Conciliation Process - Why it matters: The U.S. Supreme Court handed a victory—albeit limited—to employers when it determined that courts may consider the...more

Employers Must Consult Both State And Federal Law To Ensure Their Meal And Rest Period Practices Are Legally Compliant

A series of recent federal and state court decisions provide a mixed bag for employers on the issue of mandatory meal periods. On the one hand, these decisions support an employer’s ability to provide meal periods to its...more

When is a Lunch Break Not a Lunch Break? The Sixth Circuit and Ruffin v. MotorCity Casino

Hopefully you aren’t reading this on your lunch break, hoping that you can then count the time spent as compensable work time, especially if you’re in the Sixth Circuit. ...more

Courts Firm Up Compensability for Employees’ Break Periods

The Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals decided two cases in January 2015 notably affirming that under the Fair Labor Standards Act, 29 U.S.C. 201, et seq. an employee’s break period is only compensable if the employee spends that...more

Employment Law - January 2015

U.S. Supreme Court: Security Screenings Not Compensable - Why it matters: In a closely watched case, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously reversed the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to rule that the time spent by...more

Sixth Circuit Revisits FLSA Compliance During Employee Meal Periods

In Ruffin v. MotorCity Casino, the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals considered whether casino security guards, required to remain on casino property during meal periods, monitor two-way radios, and respond to emergencies if...more

California Employment Law Notes - January 2015

$300,000 In Punitive Damages Upheld In Sexual Harassment Case Despite Nominal Damages Award - State of Arizona v. ASARCO LLC, 2014 WL 6918577 (9th Cir. 2014) (en banc). Angela Aguilar who worked in a copper mine...more

6th Circuit: Interruptions During Meal Period Do Not Automatically Render Time Compensable

Yesterday we told you about the California Court of Appeals' decision in which the court found that it was not unlawful for an employer to require its security guards to be "on call" during rest periods. The Sixth Circuit...more

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