Section 7 The National Labor Relations Act

News & Analysis as of

Second Circuit Holds That Facebook “Like” May Be Concerted Activity Under Section 7 of the NLRA

The Second Circuit recently released a summary order in Three D, LLC v. NLRB affirming the National Labor Relations Board’s (the Board) ruling that a Facebook “like” can be construed as concerted activity under Section 7 of...more

The Second Circuit “Likes” the NLRB’s Reasoning

In recent years, the National Labor Relations Board has tended to protect employees’ social media activity against employers. A few weeks ago, the Second Circuit upheld a decision of the National Labor Relations Board...more

Facebook ‘like’ considered protected activity

Employers know that when it comes to employees discussing employment issues on social media, it is best for employers to tread carefully. A recent federal court of appeals decision confirmed that even a simple Facebook “like”...more

Student-Athletes Strike Back: Will the University of Missouri’s Football Team Strike Reinvigorate the Labor Movement in College...

On Saturday, November 7, 2015, several African American members of The University of Missouri’s varsity football team announced their intention to go on strike—refusing to attend practices, play in scheduled games or...more

Conflict of interest policy unlawful for stifling labor rights

In March of this year, General Counsel of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) issued a memo on employee handbooks and the legality of certain types of employer rules. The memo highlighted some recent cases and stressed...more

Second Circuit Sides With NLRB In Facebook Dispute

As employees continue to flock to social media in droves, employers have been craving additional guidance about how, if at all, they can regulate work-related posts. While it is no secret that employees in unionized and...more

Fifth Circuit Stands Pat, Again Rejects NLRB Attempt To Void Class And Collective Action Waiver

As expected, the Fifth Circuit once again has rejected the NLRB’s highly controversial position that the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”) prohibits employers from requiring mandatory arbitration agreements that preclude...more

Dislike Employees’ Facebook “Likes”? Fire Away at Your Own Risk

On October 21, 2015, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the ruling of the National Labor Relations Board (“Board”) decision in Triple Play Sports Bar and Grill, 361 NLRB No. 31 (2014). The employer, Triple Play, had...more

Second Circuit Finds Facebook “Likes” Protected Under NLRA

On October 21, 2015, the Second Circuit clarified in Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille v. National Labor Relations Board that protections provided under Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”) encompass...more

Second Circuit Upholds That Facebook "Likes" Can Be Protected, Concerted Activity

On October 21, 2015, the Second Circuit upheld the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) earlier ruling that clicking the Facebook “Like” button can be protected concerted activity. The Triple Play Sports Bar & Grill fired...more

NLRB: A Sole Employee Filing a Class Action Lawsuit is Protected Concerted Activity

The National Labor Relations Board’s (“NLRB”) definition of the word “concerted” is beginning to extend past its common sense meaning. The NLRB has been expanding what counts as “concerted” activity under Section 7 of the...more

Employer Strikes Out; Facebook Likes Protected by NLRA, Says Second Circuit

On Friday, at my firm’s annual Labor & Employment Law seminar, I’ll be talking about the NLRB and Employee Handbooks with my colleague, Chris Engler. Among the topics we had planned to discuss was the ongoing Triple Play...more

Affirmative Action Update: Challenging the Pay Gap

According to government studies, last year women overall made approximately 77 cents to the dollar in compensation compared to men. Black women made 64 cents to the dollar. Hispanic women made even less—55 cents to the...more

NLRB Says Employee Protest of Government Action is Protected Concerted Activity

Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act protects employees’ rights to engage in “concerted activity.” Concerted activity means persons acting on behalf of two or more employees with regard to issues involving terms and...more

Is the NLRB Outlawing Confidentiality Policies?

The National Labor Relations Board (“Board”) recently issued its decision in The Boeing Company case. The Board found that Boeing’s confidentiality policy regarding internal investigations violated the National Labor...more

The NLRB's Assault on Employee Handbooks: Potentially Illegal Workplace Rules and Policies

Most employers and their legal counsel take pride in rules and policies that have become standard fare in the workplace. Employee Handbooks almost always contain, and certainly should contain, conspicuous provisions that...more

Employment Law - August 2015 #2

The Customer Isn't Always Right—Especially When He Harasses Employees: Why it matters - Providing an important reminder about the potential for liability from customers, a new lawsuit was filed against a supermarket...more

NLRB Says Filing Class Action Lawsuit is Protected Concerted Activity

Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act prohibits employers from discriminating or retaliating against employees who engage in protected concerted activity. Concerted Activity means actions involving terms and...more

A Return Of “Common Sense” To The Courtroom? DC Circuit Concludes That AT&T Connecticut Was Justified In Banning Employees From...

How would you feel if a telephone or cable repair person showed up at your residence wearing a t-shirt that said “Inmate”? In Southern New England Telephone Company v. National Labor Relations Board the United States Court...more

Trend Alert: NLRB Holds Employee Acting Alone Engages in Concerted Activity

The NLRB, and courts interpreting the National Labor Relations Act ("NLRA"), consistently have held that to engage in concerted activity protected by Section 7, two or more employees must take action for their mutual aid or...more

NLRB Protects a New Kind of Employee Activity: Worrying About Your Job

The National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) has been on a roll in recent years, protecting such employee activity as complaining on Facebook or even hitting the “Like” button. In the case of Sabo, Inc.¸ the NLRB recently...more

6th Circuit: Despite Misconduct, Terminating Complaining Employee Still a Problem Under Section 7

Ask any school teacher and they will tell you, the key to maintaining an orderly classroom is identifying the instigator. The "instigator" is the young boy or girl (let’s be honest, usually boy) who does or says something to...more

“Common Sense” Shows The Value of a Well-Written Dissent: Southern New England Telephone Company v. NLRB

It must be frustrating to be in the minority of an administrative adjudicatory body and to constantly be forced to write dissenting opinions, as was the case for former National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) member Brian E....more

NLRB Says Employers Cannot Ask Employees Not to Discuss Internal Investigation

When conducting an internal investigation involving possible disciplinary violations, employers often ask participants in the investigation to maintain its confidentiality pending completion. Last month, the National Labor...more

New Guidance Regarding Employee Handbooks Part Six: Ensuring Conflict of Interest Rules Don’t Inhibit Protected Concerted Activity

Naturally, all employers would like to prevent their employees from engaging in activities that are in conflict with the employers’ interest. However, there is a great deal of potentially conflicting employee activity that is...more

96 Results
View per page
Page: of 4

"My best business intelligence, in one easy email…"

Your first step to building a free, personalized, morning email brief covering pertinent authors and topics on JD Supra:

Sign up to create your digest using LinkedIn*

*By using the service, you signify your acceptance of JD Supra's Privacy Policy.
*With LinkedIn, you don't need to create a separate login to manage your free JD Supra account, and we can make suggestions based on your needs and interests. We will not post anything on LinkedIn in your name. Or, sign up using your email address.