News & Analysis as of

The National Labor Relations Board 2014 Year in Review - Overview of the Board's Significant Actions

Introduction - If the National Labor Relations Board seemed to be on the ropes in 2013, it certainly came out swinging in 2014. Last year, we reported that the Board faced a number of serious legal battles. Although...more

In with the New: 2015 Privacy, Advertising and Digital Media Predictions – Part II

More predictions about privacy, advertising and digital media trends making headlines in 2015 from Of Digital Interest editor Bridget O’Connell and predictions from our London office by Rob Lister...more

Think Twice Before Firing an Employee for Facebook Posts

Social media continues to play an important role in all aspects of a company’s internal and public communications. Companies are utilizing social media to make SEC disclosures, coordinate targeted advertising and marketing...more

15 For ’15: Employment And Labor Resolutions For The New Year

While the year is still young, here are 15 New Year’s resolutions that employers may want to make: 1. Make sure your “independent contractors” are really independent contractors. ”Independent contractors” are under...more

2014/2015 Labor and Employment Observer

In This Issue: - Message from the Chair - On the Horizon: Is Obama Remaking the Workplace While Leaving Congress Behind? - The 2014 Supreme Court Decisions Every Employer Should Know - What to Expect from the...more

Poetic Justice – 2014 Wrap Up (Part 1 of 2)

This is the time of year to anxiously look forward to all that is anticipated to come in 2015. But it is also the time to look back at all that has happened in 2014. Rather than simply give you links to all of my stimulating...more

The NLRB Holds That Certain Activity on Facebook is Not Protected

The exact limits of employee protected speech on social media are still finding definition, but a recent National Labor Relations Board decision identifies at least one limit: premeditated insubordination. In Richmond...more

“Egregious” Insubordinate Facebook Post not Protected by NLRA

The National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) upheld a San Francisco nonprofit’s decision not to rehire two employees due to their Facebook conversation. In Richmond District Neighborhood Center, the nonprofit ran an...more

Employment Law - November 2014

State Voters Pass Paid Sick Leave, Wage Increases - Why it matters: The polls have closed and the votes are in: The midterm elections will have a significant impact on employers across the country as voters in multiple...more

Teach Appropriate Speech - Or risk liability for employees' derogatory on-line comments about customers

Recent District of Hawaii decision suggests social media policies are more important than ever, despite NLRB’s dramatic limits on employers’ ability to police employee speech on the Internet - Howard v. Hertz -...more

#Insubordination: NLRB Affirms Refusal To Re-Hire Employees Based Upon Facebook Exchange

In prior articles, we have discussed various decisions by the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB” or the “Board”) protecting employee social media activity as concerted activity under Section 7 the National Labor Relations...more

Employers Finally Win NLRB Facebook Case

Over the past several years, EmployNews has dutifully reported decision after decision from the National Labor Relations Board concluding that employees’ use of Facebook and other social media sites to complain about work,...more

NLRB Says On-Line Planning For Insubordination Is Not Protected Concerted Activity

In Richmond District Neighborhood Center, Case 20-CA-091748 (Oct. 28, 2014), the Board upheld an Administrative Law Judge’s ruling that a conversation between two employees, who were involved with student programming at the...more

NLRB Shows Some Restraint in its Protection of Employee Social Media Communications: Employee Termination Arising From “Egregious”...

In the wake of the NLRB’s aggressive crackdown on social media policies, many employers have asked: “Is there any limit to what employees can post on social media about their employers?” It appears that there is. Just last...more

What’s in a Like?

In the pre-Facebook era, the word “like” was primarily a verb (and an interjection sprinkled throughout valley girls’ conversations). Although you could have likes and dislikes in the sense of preferences, you could not give...more

NLRB Upholds Employee Terminations for Facebook Rant

A few weeks ago, I wrote a blog post about the recent line of NLRB cases examining what constitutes “protected, concerted” activity in the context of employees engaging in profane, insulting, or disrespectful conduct or talk...more

NLRB Finds Facebook Posts Go Too Far for the Act's Protection

As we reported previously, social media issues are troublesome for employers who must navigate unsettled or even conflicting federal and state laws and decisions. A recent ruling from the National Labor Relations Board...more

Social Media Policies Revisited: The Facebook “Like” As Protected Activity

The National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) continues to expand its reach beyond its traditional role involving unionized workforces. In particular, the NLRB has continued an aggressive campaign begun in 2011 to crackdown on...more

Board Continues Aggressive Policing of Employee Social Media Use

Stop me if you heard this one: the National Labor Relations Board recently reinstated employees who were discharged for comments made on their Facebook pages and found that the employer's social media policy was unlawful....more

NLRB Rules that Facebook “Likes” are Protected By Labor Law

One provision of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) states that employees are protected from any form of employer retaliation when they commit “concerted protected activity,” which essentially means any form of activity...more

Do Employees Have the Right to Access Social Media in the Workplace? Can Employers Block Social Media Websites?

A Pew Foundation study earlier this year found that 87% of all adults in the United States access the Internet or email, either through computers or mobile devices. The same study found that of those adults, as many as 74%...more

The NLRB's Latest Digital Developments

Last May, we highlighted a pending National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) case where the Board requested comments on whether it should reconsider its view that employees do not have a statutory right to use employer-owned...more

Employers, Take Your Heads Out of the Sand when it Comes to Social Media…

If it’s not mandatory or poses a threat to the very existence of an organization and its economic survival, employers will keep their heads in the sand pleading ignorance, while remaining apathetic. It’s kind of like my...more

Firing Employees for Critical Facebook Comments May Be Unlawful

Employers can sometimes lawfully fire employees for posting critical comments about their jobs on social media, even if employees post the comments on their own time and on their own equipment. However, that's not always the...more

NLRB Says "Liking" Another Employee's Facebook Comment is Protected Activity

The National Labor Relations Board continues its line of decisions declaring employee social media use as protected concerted activity under Section 7 of the NLRA. Last month in Triple Play Sports Bar & Grille, the Board...more

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