Supreme Court of the United States Title VII

The United States Supreme Court is the highest court of the United States and is charged with interpreting federal law, including the United States Constitution. The Court's docket is largely discretionary... more +
The United States Supreme Court is the highest court of the United States and is charged with interpreting federal law, including the United States Constitution. The Court's docket is largely discretionary with only a limited number of cases granted review each term.  The Court is comprised of one chief justice and eight associate justices, who are nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate to hold lifetime positions. less -
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California Employment Law Notes - July 2016

Employer Is Entitled To Recover $4 Million In Attorney's Fees From EEOC - CRST Van Expedited, Inc. v. EEOC, 578 U.S. ___, 136 S. Ct. 1642 (2016) - The EEOC filed suit against CRST (a trucking company) alleging...more

Supreme Court Upholds Consideration of Race in a College Admissions Program – What Does This Mean for Employer Diversity Efforts?

On June 23, 2016, the U.S. Supreme Court issued an opinion for the second time in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, (Fisher II), a case that directly questioned whether race can be considered at all in college...more

U.S. Supreme Court Provides Clarity On Statute Of Limitations In Constructive Discharge Title VII Cases

In a ruling on May 23, 2016, the United States Supreme Court provided much needed clarity on an issue that had caused a split among federal Circuit courts: when is a claim for constructive discharge under Title VII filed too...more

Supreme Court Allows Employer to Collect Fees From the EEOC Without Verdict on Merits of Claim

Title VII allows federal courts to award attorneys’ fees to the prevailing party in discrimination suits. While plaintiffs typically receive their fees if they win a discrimination or retaliation claim, defendants can also...more

Big Data Can Lead to Big Legal Problems For Companies

Deluged with an unprecedented amount of information available for analysis, companies in just about every industry are discovering increasingly sophisticated ways to make market observations, predictions and evaluations. Big...more

Employment Practices Newsletter - June 2016

EEOC Issues Final Regulations on Wellness Programs - It seems to be a win-win when employers who provide employees with incentives to encourage healthy behavior. But employers that do so must contend with an alphabet...more

Tick-Tock Goes the Clock: SCOTUS Clarifies the Statute of Limitations in Constructive Discharge Actions

On May 23, 2016, the United States Supreme Court issued its opinion in Green v. Brennan, Postmaster General, in which the Court gave aggrieved employees in workplace discrimination cases more time to file complaints against...more

Supreme Court Update: Foster V. Chatman (13-8349), Green V. Brennan (14-613) And Wittman V. Personhuballah (14-1504)

Just one new decision today (along with the first cert grant in ages). In United States Army Corps of Engineers v. Hawkes Co. (No. 15-290), the Court held that a jurisdictional determination by the Army Corps of Engineers...more

Supreme Court Says Limitations Period for Discrimination Claims Runs Beginning on Date of Constructive Discharge

Title VII and related federal civil rights laws contain short administrative claims periods that often result in preclusion of actions filed after expiration of these dates. These exclusions lead to frequent litigation...more

U.S. Supreme Court Holds that Resignation Triggers the Limitations Period for Constructive Discharge Claims

The United States Supreme Court resolved a split among appellate circuits about when an employee must take action to pursue a constructive discharge claim. The Court held that the 45-day limitation period for a federal civil...more

Spring Forward: Constructive Discharge Clock Doesn’t Start Until Employee Gives “Definite Notice” of Intent to Resign

On May 23, 2016, the Supreme Court resolved a circuit split over the deadline for employees to pursue their administrative remedies in connection with constructive discharge claims under Title VII. Generally, employees must...more

Resignation Date Starts the Statute of Limitations Clock In Constructive Discharge Cases, Supreme Court Holds

On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the statute of limitations for purposes of filing a claim alleging constructive discharge begins to run on the date that the employee resigns, as opposed to the last discriminatory...more

SCOTUS Aligns Application of Statute of Limitations in Constructive Discharge and Actual Discharge Cases

The U.S. Supreme Court held in Green v. Brennan that the statute of limitations for a constructive discharge begins to run on the date of resignation, not the date of the employer’s last discriminatory act, resolving a...more

Supreme Court: Constructive Discharge Limitations Period Begins with Notice of Resignation

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that the statute of limitations for an employee’s Title VII constructive discharge claim begins on the date of the employee’s notice of resignation. Green v. Brennan, No. 14-613 (May 23,...more

Supreme Court clarifies beginning of filing period for claims of constructive discharge under Title VII

On May 23, 2016, the US Supreme Court resolved the circuit split over when the filing period begins for a claim of constructive discharge under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The Court held the period begins when...more

Supreme Court Tells EEOC It May Be on the Hook for Fees if It Does Not Fulfill Its Statutory Pre-Suit Duties

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII) authorizes the award of attorneys’ fees to a party who prevails in a discrimination or retaliation claim brought under that statute. Although this fee shifting provision...more

Supreme Court Rules that Statute of Limitations Period for Constructive Discharge Claims Begins to Run from Date of Notice of...

The U.S. Supreme Court recently held that the statute of limitations period for constructive discharge claims under Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act (Title VII) begins to run from the date that the employee gives the...more

Supreme Court Clarifies the Time Period for Initiating Constructive Discharge Claims

On May 23, 2016, the United States Supreme Court issued its decision in Green v. Brennan, holding that the statute of limitations for a constructive discharge claim begins to run at the time the employee resigns. While the...more

SCOTUS Gives Boost To Employee Constructive Discharge Claims

In a 7-1 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled today that the statute of limitations for Title VII constructive discharge claim begins on the date of the employee’s notice of resignation, not on the date of the last alleged...more

SCOTUS Gives Plaintiffs Second Apple

Today the U.S. Supreme Court gave would-be plaintiffs not just a second bite at the apple, but an entirely new apple when it comes to Title VII limitations periods. Green v. Brennan. The Court held today that Title VII’s...more

Supreme Court Decides Green v. Brennan

On May 23, 2016, the Supreme Court of the United States decided Green v. Brennan, No. 14-613, holding that a constructive-discharge claim accrues — and the limitations period begins to run — when the employee gives notice of...more

Supreme Court Update: Green V. Brennan (14-613), Wittman V. Personhuballah (14-1504) And Foster V. Chapman (14-8349)

Three more decisions this morning—Green v. Brennan (14-613), holding that the 45-day limitations period for a constructive-discharge action under Title VII begins to run after the employee gives notice of his resignation;...more

Supreme Court: Constructive Discharge Limitations Period Starts When Employee Resigns

The Supreme Court ruled, on May 23, 2016, that for employees alleging that they were “constructively discharged” from their employment (as opposed to terminated by their employer), the statute of limitations begins to run...more

SCOTUS Rules: Notice of Resignation Starts the Clock in a Federal Employee’s Constructive Discharge Case

On May 23, 2016, the Supreme Court of the United States decided when the limitations period for filing a lawsuit begins to run for a federal employee claiming he or she resigned—or was “constructively discharged”—due to...more

Fee Wars: Supreme Court Eases Defendants’ Burden for Attorneys’ Fees in Baseless Discrimination Actions

In an 8-0 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that attorneys’ fees for successfully defending a Title VII action can be recovered by an employer even if the defendant’s victory is not based on the merits of the case....more

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