Supreme Court of the United States Title VII

The United States Supreme Court is the highest court of the United States and is charged with interpreting federal law, including the United States Constitution. The Court's docket is largely discretionary... more +
The United States Supreme Court is the highest court of the United States and is charged with interpreting federal law, including the United States Constitution. The Court's docket is largely discretionary with only a limited number of cases granted review each term.  The Court is comprised of one chief justice and eight associate justices, who are nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate to hold lifetime positions. less -
News & Analysis as of

Supreme Court Expands Religious Discrimination Liability

Most employers know that Title VII prohibits discrimination against applicants or employees based on religion. They also know that Title VII requires employers to provide reasonable, religion-based accommodations to employees...more

EEOC Rules that Sexual Orientation Discrimination is Sex Discrimination Under Title VII

On the heels of the landmark decision by the Supreme Court in favor of gay marriage, the EEOC held on July 15, 2015 that sex discrimination under Title VII includes discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. Even...more

New Developments in Protections for LGBT Workers

It’s been a busy few weeks for developments in the area of LGBT rights since the Supreme Court’s decision in King v. Burwell , 576 U.S. ___ (2015)....more

The Equality Act: Federal Anti-LGBTQ Discrimination Law Introduced in Congress

Last month, in a historic case, the U.S. Supreme Court recognized that same-sex couples—like their heterosexual counterparts— have the constitutional right to marry. On the heels of this decision, federal agencies and...more

Supreme Court Affirms FHA Disparate Impact Claims

Late last month, the Supreme Court handed down a significant decision affecting rights and obligations under the Fair Housing Act. The Court’s 5-4 decision in Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. Inclusive...more

Health and Welfare Benefits for Same-Sex Spouses after Obergefell: A New Mandate for Employers?

After last month’s decision by the U.S. Supreme Court in Obergefell v. Hodges, employee benefit plan sponsors may wonder whether Obergefell affirmatively imposes an obligation for employers to provide health, life,...more

That is SO last week - July 2015 #3

There’s just no rest for employment lawyers this summer. We had another exciting week. The biggest news was the EEOC’s ruling that Title VII prohibits discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. The agency found that...more

Is Sexual Orientation Now a Protected Class?

In our June 26 alert regarding the U.S. Supreme Court's same-sex marriage decision in Obergefell v. Hodges, we said we would continue to keep you posted regarding new developments in this area of the law. Some of you may...more

California Employment Law Notes - July 2015

Employee's Inability To Work For A Particular Supervisor Does Not Constitute A "Disability" - Higgins-Williams v. Sutter Med. Found., 237 Cal. App. 4th 78 (2015) - Michaelin Higgins-Williams worked as a clinical...more

The Obergefell Decision and Employers

The recent United States Supreme Court decision in Obergefell v. Hodges significantly altered the legal landscape with respect to same-sex marriages, finding that the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution...more

The Supreme Court Addresses Federal Health Care Subsidies and Same-Sex Marriage

Two recent Supreme Court decisions have implications for employee benefit plan sponsors: King v. Burwell, decided June 25, 2015, and Obergefell v. Hodges, decided June 26, 2015....more

Supremes Expand Liability Under FHA

On June 25, 2015, the Supreme Court of the United States, by a margin of 5-4, held that disparate impact claims are cognizable under the Fair Housing Act. Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The Inclusive...more

Same-Sex Marriage and Employment Discrimination: The Future of Sexual Orientation Bias Claims

On June 26, 2015, the Supreme Court of the United States legalized same-sex marriage throughout the country. In Oberfell v. Hodges, the Court held that Section 1 of the Fourteenth Amendment – commonly referred to as the Equal...more

Employment Law - July 2015

The Impact of National Same-Sex Marriage for Employers - Why it matters: How will employers feel the impact of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Obergefell v. Hodges? The landmark ruling that the Fourteenth...more

Supreme Court Rules Against Abercrombie & Fitch in Religious Discrimination Case

In a previous blog post we discussed the facts, and potential consequences of a pro-plaintiff holding in Equal Employment Opportunity Commission v. Abercrombie & Fitch Store, Inc. As a brief recap, in 2008, Samantha Elauf, a...more

EEOC Issues Guidance - Best Practices for Pregnancy Discrimination and Related Issues

Discrimination on the basis of pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions constitutes unlawful sex discrimination under Title VII. The EEOC recently issued new Enforcement Guidance to ensure employers treat women...more

Impact of Young V. UPS and Steps for Employers

Since 1978, pregnancy and pregnancy related health conditions have been protected conditions under the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (“PDA”). A recent Supreme Court case, Young v. UPS may increase the ability of pregnant...more

The Gay Marriage Decision: Support for Title VII Employment Discrimination Claims?

Following the excitement of the same-sex marriage decision by the U.S. Supreme Court on June 26th, the question remains how much the Opinion may impact Title VII employment discrimination claims. Based on our reading of the...more

Supreme Court Upholds Broad Interpretation of FHA

In a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court ruled that disparate impact claims can be brought under the Fair Housing Act (“FHA”). Disparate impact claims attack policies or practices that are facially neutral but have a...more

U.S. Supreme Court Rules Against Abercrombie In Headscarf Religious Accommodation Case

The U.S. Supreme Court reinstated the EEOC’s lawsuit against Abercrombie & Fitch Stores, Inc., alleging that Abercrombie violated Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 by refusing to hire a Muslim applicant, who wore a...more

U.S. Supreme Court Issues Ruling Favorable To Employers Involved In Disparate-Impact Litigation

On June 25, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a 5 to 4 ruling in Texas Dep’t of Housing & Community Affairs v. Inclusive Communities Project, Inc., No. 13-1371 (2015). Now that the dust has settled from the Supreme Court’s...more

U.S. Supreme Court Upholds Disparate-Impact Claims in Fair Housing Act Cases

On June 25, 2015, in Texas Dep't of Housing and Community Affairs v. Inclusive Communities Project, the U.S. Supreme Court held that a plaintiff may establish a prima facie case under the Fair Housing Act (FHA) on the basis...more

What Will Employers Likely See (or Not See) in the Wake of the Supreme Court's Same-Sex Marriage Decision?

Now that the hubbub surrounding the Supreme Court’s June 26 decision in the consolidated case of Obergefell v. Hodges has begun to level off, employers are wondering how the decision will impact their workplaces. (In case...more

Lending Industry Take Note: Federal Fair Housing Act Provides For Disparate-Impact Liability

The status quo stands, to a degree. By a 5-4 vote, the United States Supreme Court has concluded that the federal Fair Housing Act (“FHA”) authorizes lawsuits not just for intentional discrimination, but for conduct taken...more

Obergefell v. Hodges – Same-Sex Marriage Now Legal in All 50 States

In 2013, the Supreme Court, in United States v. Windsor, struck down Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (“DOMA”) which defined marriage, for Federal purposes, as between one man and one woman. The Windsor ruling...more

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