Supreme Court of the United States Title VII

The United States Supreme Court is the highest court of the United States and is charged with interpreting federal law, including the United States Constitution. The Court's docket is largely discretionary... more +
The United States Supreme Court is the highest court of the United States and is charged with interpreting federal law, including the United States Constitution. The Court's docket is largely discretionary with only a limited number of cases granted review each term.  The Court is comprised of one chief justice and eight associate justices, who are nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate to hold lifetime positions. less -
News & Analysis as of

Massachusetts High Court Examines Disparate Impact Theory in Light of Recent Supreme Court Decision

A ruling last week by Massachusetts' highest state court demonstrates courts' vigorous examination of disparate impact housing claims in light of recent judicial guidance, as well as the type of proactive measures property...more

Employment Law - April 2016

Supreme Court Gives Stamp of Approval to Representative Statistical Evidence - Why it matters - In a closely watched case, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that the use of representative statistical evidence for...more

Employment Practices Newsletter - April 2016

Is Labor Law Putting the Franchise Business Model at Risk? - Over the course of the last year, we have kept you abreast of National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) case law and Department of Labor (DOL) interpretive/...more

U.S. Supreme Court Hears Oral Argument In EEOC v. CRST Van Expedited, Inc.

Yesterday the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments in EEOC v. CRST Van Expedited, Inc. Involving the largest fee sanction award ever levied against the EEOC – nearly $4.7 million – EEOC v. CRST Van Expedited, Inc....more

Quick Hits: Persuader Rules, Class Action Lawsuits, Prevailing Party, E-mail Phishing

With Opening Day of baseball season nearly upon us, it’s time again to bring back a “Quick Hits” segment to recap a few noteworthy (but not completely post-worthy) employment law items you might have missed recently....more

Truckin’ To The Top Court: CRST Files Final Reply Brief Before Supreme Court Argument Against EEOC

In high-stakes litigation brought by the EEOC against trucking company CRST Van Expedited, Inc., (“CRST”), CRST recently submitted its final reply brief before the U.S. Supreme Court hears oral argument in the case later this...more

Would ‘St. Patrick’s Way’ Qualify for a Workplace Accommodation?

If Saint Patrick walked into your workplace today, how would he and his beliefs be received? As we gather on March 17, amidst the shamrocks and celebrations, let’s not forget why we honor the life of this patron saint. Born...more

Title VII and Islamophobia: Maintaining Compliance

Over The Past Decade, There Has Been An Increase In Islamophobia perpetuated by negative stereotypes resulting in bias, discrimination and marginalization. That presents an issue to which all employers must be sensitive....more

Update on the U.S. Supreme Court’s Inclusive Communities Decision

As previously reported on this blog, the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. Inclusive Communities Project, Inc., 135 S. Ct. 2507 (2015) adopted a burden-shifting approach to...more

How Justice Scalia's Death Could Have Profound Reverberations for Employers

The sudden death of Associate Justice Antonin Scalia of the Supreme Court of the United States, who served on the Court for over 30 years, has touched off a heated political debate over the appointment and consideration of...more

Justice Scalia’s Employment Law Legacy

On February 13, 2016, Justice Antonin Scalia, the anchor of the Court’s conservative wing for nearly three decades, passed away. He leaves behind a distinguished legal career that involved experience in wide range of roles....more

“We Don’t Want To Pay $4.7 Million” – EEOC Files Its Supreme Court Brief in CRST Fee Sanction Case

As we recently blogged here, EEOC v. CRST Van Expedited, Inc. is an important case on the Supreme Court’s docket that employers absolutely need to monitor. At issue is whether attorneys’ fees are appropriate in instances...more

Every Vote Counts: The Scalia Legacy And The Future Of Employment Class Actions Before The Supreme Court

As we blogged earlier this week, the death of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia on February 13 has sent shockwaves throughout the halls of power in Washington, D.C. The balance within the U.S. Supreme Court between...more

All 'Jiggery-Pokery' Aside: Justice Scalia's Impact on Employment Law

Allow me to be the palate cleanser to Mitch McConnell's shotgun-wedding-esque "memoir" to Justice Scalia. Barely an hour after the Supreme Court announced Scalia's death, McConnell briefly offered his condolences to Scalia's...more

Scalia’s Employment Law Legacy: More Complicated Than You Think

About a decade ago, I had the good fortune to sit at a table with Justice Antonin Scalia over a long lunch. He was a distinguished speaker for the Young Lawyers’ Section of the Connecticut Bar Association and, as a former...more

EEOC Proposes Expansive Enforcement Guidance for Retaliation Claims

For the first time in nearly 20 years, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has issued proposed enforcement guidance regarding retaliation claims. According to the EEOC, the revised guidance is necessary in light of...more

Briefing For The Big Bucks: CRST Asks U.S. Supreme Court For Attorneys’ Fees From The EEOC

EEOC v. CRST Van Expedited, Inc. is a key case for all employers. We have been tracking the developments in this case since its inception. Now it has reached the U.S. Supreme Court on the issue of whether attorneys’...more

Labor and Employment News: Retaliation Claims Are Difficult to Defend: Redux

A few weeks ago, we reported on a retaliation judgment in U.S. District Court, Connecticut, Summerlin v. Almost Family, Inc. ("Retaliation Claims Difficult to Defend"). The retaliation case discussed below did not cost the...more

Mach Mining Part 3: Supreme Court Gem Resurfaces In Southern District Of Illinois

Following the U.S. Supreme Court’s landmark decision in Mach Mining v. EEOC, 135 S.Ct. 1645 (2015), which held that a judge may review whether the EEOC satisfied its statutory obligation to attempt conciliation before filing...more

Sexual-Orientation Discrimination: The Lessons for Most Employers Will Be Clear Even if Federal Law Remains Unsettled

Attitudes toward same sex relationships have experienced enormous change in recent years. Perhaps the most dramatic manifestation of this shift is the Supreme Court’s decision this June in Obergefell v. Hodges striking down...more

Employment Law Navigator – Week in Review: December 7, 2015

‘Tis the season for holiday cheer and employer-sponsored celebrations. It’s a good time to heed the words of sage employment lawyers who want to help you avoid celebration-related complaints, charges and lawsuits. Last...more

First Circuit Withdraws Earlier Opinion in Location-Based Discrimination Case; Issues Less Expansive Amended Opinion

In August, we wrote about the First Circuit Court of Appeals’ decision in Abril-Rivera v. Johnson, which affirmed a lower court ruling dismissing location-based discrimination and retaliation claims against FEMA. Last week,...more

Missouri Appeals Court Holds Sexual Orientation Discrimination is not Prohibited by Missouri Human Rights Act

In a case of first impression at the appellate level, the Missouri Court of Appeals for the Western District of Missouri has held that the Missouri Human Rights Act (“MHRA”) does not prohibit discrimination based on sexual...more

Relying on the Supreme Court’s Ruling in Mach Mining, Illinois Court Holds that the Sufficiency of an EEOC Investigation is not...

As we have previously reported, the U.S. Supreme Court held earlier this year in EEOC v. Mach Mining, 135 S.Ct. 1645 (2015) that courts have the authority to review whether the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)...more

Avoiding Discrimination Claims After Obergefell

In June 2015, the Supreme Court of the United States issued its long-awaited opinion in Obergefell v. Hodges, striking down bans on same-sex marriage as unconstitutional and legalizing same-sex marriage in every state (135 S....more

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