News & Analysis as of

Section 7 Social Media

Employer Cannot Fire Employees For Obscenity-Laced Facebook Posts During Union Organizing Campaign

by Tonkon Torp LLP on

Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act protects employees who engage in concerted activities for purposes of collective bargaining or for mutual aid and protection. How far that protection extends was tested in NLRB v....more

Second Circuit Holds Termination of Employee Who Attacked Supervisor in Obscene Facebook Post Violates NLRA

The Second Circuit said last week that an employer violated the National Labor Relations Act when it fired an employee who criticized a supervisor on Facebook during an election. The catch here is that the Second Circuit...more

The National Labor Relations Board’s Crackdown on Social Media Policies

by Arnall Golden Gregory LLP on

If your company has a social media policy in its handbook, that policy is in the crosshairs of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). The NLRB is the agency that enforces the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA), which,...more

NLRB Continues to "Like" Enforcement over Social Media Policies and Related Issues

by Baker Donelson on

In recent years, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has focused attention on company policies that attempt to limit employee engagement in social media. Specifically, the NLRB has consistently taken the position that...more

Even Non-Union Employers Must Consider the National Labor Relations Act When Drafting Social Media Policies

While employers should enact social media policies to protect trade secrets and prevent employees from defaming the employer, employers must ensure the policies do not violate the National Labor Relations Act (“Act”). Even...more

2016 presidential election dynamics in the workplace: Free speech? ‘You’re fired’

by McAfee & Taft on

None of us are immune from this year’s presidential election dynamics. Disrespect and name-calling seem more prevalent than policy discussions. The election is highly polarizing, potentially pitting employee against...more

NLRB Administrative Judge Finds Employee Facebook Post Was Protected Speech

by Seyfarth Shaw LLP on

Seyfarth Synopsis: A new NLRB decision that attempts to define further the boundaries of protected speech under the NLRA. In Laborers’ International Union of North America and Mantell, Case No. 03-CB-136940 (NLRB...more

NLRB Ruling in Social Media Case Provides Useful Guidance for Employers

by Littler on

Drafting a social media policy in compliance with Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA” or “the Act”) has become increasingly challenging for employers, as the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB” or “the...more

Quirky Question #279: Concerted Activity in 140 Characters or Less

by Dorsey & Whitney LLP on

Question: I am a manager in a medium-sized retailer that has locations and employees in 16 states. The company maintains a social media policy, which was recently updated. ...more

#Concerted Activity in 140 Characters or Less

by Dorsey & Whitney LLP on

Employees have increasingly voiced concerns on social media regarding their employment, often including specific statements about their employers. As previously discussed on this blog, an employee’s Facebook post related to...more

Second Circuit Holds That Facebook “Like” May Be Concerted Activity Under Section 7 of the NLRA

The Second Circuit recently released a summary order in Three D, LLC v. NLRB affirming the National Labor Relations Board’s (the Board) ruling that a Facebook “like” can be construed as concerted activity under Section 7 of...more

The Second Circuit “Likes” the NLRB’s Reasoning

by Kelley Drye & Warren LLP on

In recent years, the National Labor Relations Board has tended to protect employees’ social media activity against employers. A few weeks ago, the Second Circuit upheld a decision of the National Labor Relations Board...more

Second Circuit Affirms NLRB View That Facebook "Likes" Are Protected Concerted Activity

Last week, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals backed the National Labor Relations Board’s position that employee social media postings are protected concerted activity under federal law, even if they use obscenities that...more

Second Circuit Finds Facebook “Likes” Protected Under NLRA

by Genova Burns LLC on

On October 21, 2015, the Second Circuit clarified in Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille v. National Labor Relations Board that protections provided under Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”) encompass...more

Second Circuit Upholds That Facebook "Likes" Can Be Protected, Concerted Activity

by Faegre Baker Daniels on

On October 21, 2015, the Second Circuit upheld the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) earlier ruling that clicking the Facebook “Like” button can be protected concerted activity. The Triple Play Sports Bar & Grill fired...more

Weigand v. N.L.R.B: A Double Standard for Social Media?

by BakerHostetler on

On April 17, 2015, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit upheld a National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB” or “Board”) decision finding a local branch of the Amalgamated Transit Union (“Union”) could...more

Workplace Challenges in 2015, Part 2 of 5: Continued Focus on Social Media Policies That the NLRB Will Endorse

During our workplace privacy segment, our presenters, Mintz Levin attorneys Cynthia Larose and Richard Block, and Vice President, Deputy General Counsel of Time, Inc., Michelle Goldstein, addressed several issues that...more

NLRB Says "Liking" Another Employee's Facebook Comment is Protected Activity

The National Labor Relations Board continues its line of decisions declaring employee social media use as protected concerted activity under Section 7 of the NLRA. Last month in Triple Play Sports Bar & Grille, the Board...more

NLRB's Recent Triple Play Decision Tackles Two Critical Social Media Issues for Employers

by Littler on

With the intersection between cutting-edge social media and the Depression-era National Labor Relations Act (NLRA or the Act) still relatively new, employers are looking for answers to some fundamental questions when it comes...more

NLRB Gets #SocialMedia: Board and ALJ Rulings Recap

‘April rulings bring May muddling’ might be a better way to tweet recent social media decisions at the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) given the Board’s ruling in Durham School Services (April 25, 2014) and an...more

Courteous, professional workplace policy outlawed

by McAfee & Taft on

In recent months, some of the National Labor Relations Board’s intentions have become obvious. First, the NLRB plans on devoting considerable attention and resources towards non-union employees and employers. Next, the NLRB...more

She tweeted what?!

by McAfee & Taft on

Employers may have become familiar with some of the legal and human resources issues involving social media use by employees. However, one social media platform offers an illustration of the many evolving legal, human...more

Non-Unionized Employers: The NLRB Commands Your Attention

Many non-unionized employers might be surprised to learn that they, too, are governed by the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). In fact, in 2012, the NLRB launched a website directed at non-union employees, which details...more

The National Labor Relations Board 2012 Year in Review

Introduction - Wow, 2012 was quite the year for the National Labor Relations Board (“Board”)! Last year, we discussed the Board’s agenda, which at the time we described as aggressive, but with the benefit of...more

Employers Must Examine Their Employee Agreements For Compliance With The National Labor Relations Act

by Akerman LLP - HR Defense on

Recently, an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) for the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) issued a decision in Quicken Loans, Inc., which found confidentiality and non-disparagement provisions to be unlawful under the...more

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