Facebook Social Media Policy

News & Analysis as of

MIND YOUR OWN BUSINESS!: New Employment Laws for Social Media Accounts

The Nutshell - Effective July 1, 2015, Virginia Code § 40.1-28.7:5 prohibits employers from requiring that current or prospective employees disclose information about their personal social media accounts....more

Virginia May Soon Join Maryland in Prohibiting Employers from Asking for Social Media Passwords

Virginia appears poised to join Maryland and a handful of other states that ban employers from asking current employees and applicants for access to their social media accounts, like Facebook....more

Will the Second Circuit “Like” the NLRB’s Recent Stance on Social Media? An Update on the Facebook “Like” Firing Case

The NLRB last week filed its brief at the Second Circuit Court of Appeals in the well-publicized Facebook “Like” firing case, Three D, LLC v. NLRB. Prior to the appeal, we discussed the NLRB’s August 2014 ruling here as part...more

Are You A Nasty Mother Fu*ker?

I don’t know if you are or aren’t. That’s probably for a different timeforhardselfassessmentlawblog.com (wish I had purchased that domain). However, I do know that your employees apparently can call their manager a nasty...more

Court Denies Summary Judgment to Employer on Professor’s Allegations He Was Denied Tenure After Reporting Inappropriate Facebook...

A federal court in Oklahoma recently denied summary judgment to Northeastern State University, finding that a professor’s discrimination and retaliation claims, among others, could proceed to trial. The professor, Dr. Leslie...more

Summary Judgment Denied On “Fair Use” Defense In 9/11 Photograph Case

On February 10, 2015, the Southern District of New York denied Fox News’ motion for summary judgment in a copyright lawsuit involving the posting of a copyrighted image on its Facebook page. North Jersey Media Group, Inc. v....more

Employer beware: NLRA rulings often conflict with existing employer policies

One of the biggest misconceptions employers have is that the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) only applies to unionized employers. As a result, employers may hear of an adverse ruling from the National Labor Relations...more

The National Labor Relations Board 2014 Year in Review - Overview of the Board's Significant Actions

Introduction - If the National Labor Relations Board seemed to be on the ropes in 2013, it certainly came out swinging in 2014. Last year, we reported that the Board faced a number of serious legal battles. Although...more

Think Twice Before Firing an Employee for Facebook Posts

Social media continues to play an important role in all aspects of a company’s internal and public communications. Companies are utilizing social media to make SEC disclosures, coordinate targeted advertising and marketing...more

Tennessee’s New Social Media Law Gives Employers Dos and Don’ts Regarding Employee Privacy

All Tennessee employers and their agents must now comply with the “Employee Online Privacy Act of 2014,” a new law that prohibits employers from asking their employees for their usernames and passwords to social media sites,...more

Secret Connections: LinkedIn contacts may be a trade secret

A California court recently determined that an employee’s LinkedIn contacts could be considered a “trade secret” in a case where the employee retained his contacts after he left the company and began a competing venture....more

Teach Appropriate Speech - Or risk liability for employees' derogatory on-line comments about customers

Recent District of Hawaii decision suggests social media policies are more important than ever, despite NLRB’s dramatic limits on employers’ ability to police employee speech on the Internet - Howard v. Hertz -...more

NLRB Shows Some Restraint in its Protection of Employee Social Media Communications: Employee Termination Arising From “Egregious”...

In the wake of the NLRB’s aggressive crackdown on social media policies, many employers have asked: “Is there any limit to what employees can post on social media about their employers?” It appears that there is. Just last...more

NLRB Finds Facebook Posts Go Too Far for the Act's Protection

As we reported previously, social media issues are troublesome for employers who must navigate unsettled or even conflicting federal and state laws and decisions. A recent ruling from the National Labor Relations Board...more

Social Media Policies Revisited: The Facebook “Like” As Protected Activity

The National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) continues to expand its reach beyond its traditional role involving unionized workforces. In particular, the NLRB has continued an aggressive campaign begun in 2011 to crackdown on...more

Board Continues Aggressive Policing of Employee Social Media Use

Stop me if you heard this one: the National Labor Relations Board recently reinstated employees who were discharged for comments made on their Facebook pages and found that the employer's social media policy was unlawful....more

Do Employees Have the Right to Access Social Media in the Workplace? Can Employers Block Social Media Websites?

A Pew Foundation study earlier this year found that 87% of all adults in the United States access the Internet or email, either through computers or mobile devices. The same study found that of those adults, as many as 74%...more

Firing Employees for Critical Facebook Comments May Be Unlawful

Employers can sometimes lawfully fire employees for posting critical comments about their jobs on social media, even if employees post the comments on their own time and on their own equipment. However, that's not always the...more

NLRB: Facebook “Like” is Protected, Concerted Activity Under the Labor Act

The NLRB recently issued another case on employer social media policies, ruling that clicking Facebook’s “Like” button can constitute “protected, concerted” employee activity under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA)....more

NLRB Continues Aggressive Crackdown on Social Media Policies

In the past few years the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) has taken an increased interest in whether workplace policies prohibiting employees from discussing the terms and conditions of their employment on social...more

Should an employer have a written social media policy? [Video]

Phoenix business law firm Jaburg Wilk's Employment law attorney Kraig Marton discusses whether an employer should have a written social media policy. He also talks about whether an employee can get in trouble for what they...more

Facebook: Fireable Offense or Free Speech?

The interplay between an employee’s postings on Facebook and the impact of those postings on his or her employment status is an evolving area of the law. Just last month, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of...more

Labor & Employment E-Note - January 16, 2014

In This Issue: - 13 States Set to Raise Minimum Wage, 11 More Consider Increases - EEOC Reports $372.1M in Monetary Relief for Workplace Bias Claims - N.Y.U. Graduate Assistants Vote to Affiliate with UAW -...more

Employees' use of social media - navigating the potential pitfalls

The use of social media is endemic. According to Facebook’s own statistics, the social networking giant has an average of 699 million active daily users, 1.15 billion monthly active users, and 819 million monthly active users...more

What's in a "Like"? Precedent-Setting Case Poses New Risk for Employers

The ubiquitous thumbs-up icon in Facebook has gained new prominence for private employers. In a case of first impression, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit held that an employee fired for "liking" the campaign...more

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