Facebook Social Media Policy

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Second Circuit “Likes” Where NLRB Shakes Out on Social Media: Finds that Facebook “Likes” and Obscenity-Riddled Posts Were...

A unanimous panel of the Second Circuit recently upheld the NLRB’s well-publicized Facebook “Like” decision, which found that a sports bar violated the National Labor Relations Act when it terminated two employees for...more

Where’s the “Dislike” Button? 2nd Circuit Affirms Employee-Friendly Social Media Ruling

In my last post on HR legalist, I outlined the current state of the law regarding employee social media use. One trend I have been following is the National Labor Relations Board’s expansion of protections for employees who...more

Social Media Compliance Policies: Your Company Needs One

Use of social media is ubiquitous in today's society. This is astounding when you think back to 2004 and realize that social media did not exist then. Fast forward ten years and by September 2014, 58% of all American adults...more

Second Circuit Affirms NLRB View That Facebook "Likes" Are Protected Concerted Activity

Last week, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals backed the National Labor Relations Board’s position that employee social media postings are protected concerted activity under federal law, even if they use obscenities that...more

Second Circuit Sides With NLRB In Facebook Dispute

As employees continue to flock to social media in droves, employers have been craving additional guidance about how, if at all, they can regulate work-related posts. While it is no secret that employees in unionized and...more

Second Circuit Upholds NLRB's Triple Play Decision, Expanding Section 7 Protections for Employees' Social Media Activity

Obscenities alone—even when viewed by an employer's customers—do not deprive employees engaged in protected concerted activity of the National Labor Relations Act's ("NLRA" or the "Act") protections. So held the U.S. Court...more

Court “Likes” NLRB’s Determination that Facebook Posts Are Protected under the NLRA

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals recently upheld the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) decision that employees’ Facebook posts are protected by the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). Three D, LLC d/b/a Triple Play...more

Second Circuit Upholds NLRB Decision: Discharge of Employees for Facebook “Likes” Was Unlawful

On October 22, 2015, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) decision that Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille (Employer) violated Section 8(a)(1) of the National Labor Relations...more

Second Circuit Says Facebook Profanity Directed at Employer is Protected - Employer Violated NLRA by Terminating Two Employees...

In Three D, LLC d/b/a/ Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille v. NLRB, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit upheld the National Labor Relations Board's (the Board) determination that the employer, Triple Play,...more

Dislike Employees’ Facebook “Likes”? Fire Away at Your Own Risk

On October 21, 2015, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the ruling of the National Labor Relations Board (“Board”) decision in Triple Play Sports Bar and Grill, 361 NLRB No. 31 (2014). The employer, Triple Play, had...more

Like It Or Not, Your Employees Can Like It

It gets boring to blog just about the NLRB. We need some judicial action to get the juices flowing a little more. We got a little something last week. Question: Is merely clicking the “like” button on Facebook tantamount to...more

To Tweet or Not to Tweet: Social Media and Intellectual Property Issues

Social media platforms are very useful, but they also create legal issues. Without question, social media has changed the way businesses communicate with their clients and consumers. Likewise, social media has changed the way...more

Socially Aware: The Social Media Law Update Volume 6, Issue 4

Five social media law issues to discuss with your clients - The explosive growth of social media has clients facing legal questions that didn’t even exist a few short years ago. Helping your clients navigate this...more

“Like” it or Not? Tips for Addressing Employee Social Media Use

At first, employee social media use sounds like a matter of common sense. Candidates for a job should be careful what they post on social media sites, and make sure they’re not sharing any unsavory details about their past...more

Status Updates: Court nixes VPPA claim; lawyer suspended over blog posts; Facebook ‘unfriending’ cited in bullying decision

Tale of the tape. The Video Privacy Protection Act (VPPA), which requires video service providers to destroy personally identifiable information after a specified time, doesn’t provide a private right of action for plaintiffs...more

Eight Years Later: Three Big Changes in Employment Law

2007 seems like yesterday. And yet, eight years after I started this blog and over 1800 posts later (and a Hall of Fame entry), I’m pretty sure 2007 WASN’T yesterday. So for this year’s anniversary post, I thought I...more

Status Updates: Appeals court upholds anti-cyberbullying law; better marketing through neural networks; restaurant owner turns the...

Cruel intentions. Laws seeking to regulate speech on the Internet must be narrowly drafted to avoid running afoul of the First Amendment, and limiting such a law’s applicability to intentional attempts to cause damage usually...more

Hold that Friend Request: Legal Traps in a Post-Facebook Work Environment

Many well-meaning managers engage with employees on social media websites, and doing so provides a host of benefits: stronger relationships between employees and management; a sense of collegiality; instant updates on...more

Social Media Week Part IV – Telling a Story About Honey

I continue my exploration of the use of social media in doing compliance by taking a look at a very innovative social media solution to a difficult compliance issue around, of all things, honey. This example shows how...more

Demanding Access To Social Media And Personal Information - Is It Legal?

Employers, both public and private, are using social media websites such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn, to learn about prospective or current employees. Some employers have even gone so far as to request that...more

MIND YOUR OWN BUSINESS!: New Employment Laws for Social Media Accounts

The Nutshell - Effective July 1, 2015, Virginia Code § 40.1-28.7:5 prohibits employers from requiring that current or prospective employees disclose information about their personal social media accounts....more

Will the Second Circuit “Like” the NLRB’s Recent Stance on Social Media? An Update on the Facebook “Like” Firing Case

The NLRB last week filed its brief at the Second Circuit Court of Appeals in the well-publicized Facebook “Like” firing case, Three D, LLC v. NLRB. Prior to the appeal, we discussed the NLRB’s August 2014 ruling here as part...more

Are You A Nasty Mother Fu*ker?

I don’t know if you are or aren’t. That’s probably for a different timeforhardselfassessmentlawblog.com (wish I had purchased that domain). However, I do know that your employees apparently can call their manager a nasty...more

Court Denies Summary Judgment to Employer on Professor’s Allegations He Was Denied Tenure After Reporting Inappropriate Facebook...

A federal court in Oklahoma recently denied summary judgment to Northeastern State University, finding that a professor’s discrimination and retaliation claims, among others, could proceed to trial. The professor, Dr. Leslie...more

Summary Judgment Denied On “Fair Use” Defense In 9/11 Photograph Case

On February 10, 2015, the Southern District of New York denied Fox News’ motion for summary judgment in a copyright lawsuit involving the posting of a copyrighted image on its Facebook page. North Jersey Media Group, Inc. v....more

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