National Labor Relations Board Facebook

The National Labor Relations Board is an independent agency of the United States federal government created in 1935 as part of the National Labor Relations Act. The Board consists of five presidentially-appointed... more +
The National Labor Relations Board is an independent agency of the United States federal government created in 1935 as part of the National Labor Relations Act. The Board consists of five presidentially-appointed members, who are charged with overseeing union elections and hearing complaints of unfair labor practices under the NLRA.    less -
News & Analysis as of

NLRB Finds That Employer Could Rescind Offers After Workers Discussed Detailed Insubordination Plans on Facebook

In a (rare) positive social media decision for employers, the NLRB ruled on October 28th in Richmond District Neighborhood Center, Case 20–CA–091748 (Oct. 28, 2014), that two employees who discussed their insubordination...more

NLRB Finally Finds Facebook Activity That It Doesn’t “Like”

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) finally found a Facebook conversation it couldn’t bring itself to “Like.” In Richmond District Neighborhood Center, Case 20-CA-091748 (October 28, 2014), the NLRB held that a Facebook...more

Social Media Policies Revisited: The Facebook “Like” As Protected Activity

The National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) continues to expand its reach beyond its traditional role involving unionized workforces. In particular, the NLRB has continued an aggressive campaign begun in 2011 to crackdown on...more

Board Continues Aggressive Policing of Employee Social Media Use

Stop me if you heard this one: the National Labor Relations Board recently reinstated employees who were discharged for comments made on their Facebook pages and found that the employer's social media policy was unlawful....more

NLRB Rules that Facebook “Likes” are Protected By Labor Law

One provision of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) states that employees are protected from any form of employer retaliation when they commit “concerted protected activity,” which essentially means any form of activity...more

Do Employees Have the Right to Access Social Media in the Workplace? Can Employers Block Social Media Websites?

A Pew Foundation study earlier this year found that 87% of all adults in the United States access the Internet or email, either through computers or mobile devices. The same study found that of those adults, as many as 74%...more

Firing Employees for Critical Facebook Comments May Be Unlawful

Employers can sometimes lawfully fire employees for posting critical comments about their jobs on social media, even if employees post the comments on their own time and on their own equipment. However, that's not always the...more

NLRB Still “Likes” Expansive Employee Speech

Unlike many issues, it seems that at least one issue (so far) has the NLRB on the same page as a recent court decision: whether clicking “like” on Facebook amounts to substantive, protectable speech. In my earlier blog posts...more

NLRB Says "Liking" Another Employee's Facebook Comment is Protected Activity

The National Labor Relations Board continues its line of decisions declaring employee social media use as protected concerted activity under Section 7 of the NLRA. Last month in Triple Play Sports Bar & Grille, the Board...more

A NLRB Decision Employers Will Not "Like"

On August 22, 2014, the National Labor Relations Board ("NLRB") issued a 3-member panel, unanimous decision that the termination of two employees because of their Facebook activity violated the National Labor Relations Act....more

NLRB: Facebook “Like” is Protected, Concerted Activity Under the Labor Act

The NLRB recently issued another case on employer social media policies, ruling that clicking Facebook’s “Like” button can constitute “protected, concerted” employee activity under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA)....more

NLRB Holds That Discharge of Employees for Facebook Conversation Was Unlawful

On August 22, 2014, the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) issued companion decisions in Three D, LLC d/b/a Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille, holding that the employer violated the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”)...more

Protected Concerted Activity on Facebook: The NLRB “Likes” This

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) continues to expand its interpretation of the forms of employee online behavior that constitute protected concerted activity under the National Labor Relations Act. Recently, in Three...more

NLRB Continues Aggressive Crackdown on Social Media Policies

In the past few years the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) has taken an increased interest in whether workplace policies prohibiting employees from discussing the terms and conditions of their employment on social...more

NLRB's Recent Triple Play Decision Tackles Two Critical Social Media Issues for Employers

With the intersection between cutting-edge social media and the Depression-era National Labor Relations Act (NLRA or the Act) still relatively new, employers are looking for answers to some fundamental questions when it comes...more

Status Updates - August 2014 #12

..What’s not to like? The National Labor Relations Board has ruled that an employee’s Facebook “like” approving of another employee’s statements about their employer may constitute “concerted activity” under federal labor...more

More Reasons for Employers to "DISLIKE" Facebook

The National Labor Relations Board is at it again – wading into the social media foray, that is. In a case that has been percolating since 2011, the NLRB has ruled that an employer must reinstate an employee who was...more

Employment Law - July 2014

Recess Is Over: Supreme Court Strikes NLRB Appointments - Why it matters: Striking a blow to the President and the National Labor Relations Board, the U.S. Supreme Court held that three recess appointments made by...more

Antisocial Media - Union Not Liable For Threatening Facebook Posts

Imagine if you will, that a company-sponsored website allows employees to post comments. During the course of a union strike, an employee who chooses to cross the picket line posts a comment threatening to kill union members...more

Social Media & Protected Activity: Not Always a Third Rail for Employers

The efforts of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) to expand the definition of employee activity protected by section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) and its aggressive prosecution of employers alleged to...more

Should an employer have a written social media policy? [Video]

Phoenix business law firm Jaburg Wilk's Employment law attorney Kraig Marton discusses whether an employer should have a written social media policy. He also talks about whether an employee can get in trouble for what they...more

Employee Fired For Facebook Rant Doesn't Like Status

There’s no doubt about it – Facebook is the 21st Century water cooler. Workers who used to gather in the break room to talk about the latest sports news, the newest outrageous celebrity scandal, or the latest office gossip...more

Labor & Employment E-Note - January 16, 2014

In This Issue: - 13 States Set to Raise Minimum Wage, 11 More Consider Increases - EEOC Reports $372.1M in Monetary Relief for Workplace Bias Claims - N.Y.U. Graduate Assistants Vote to Affiliate with UAW -...more

Poetic Justice - 2013 Wrap Up (Part 1 of 2)

This is the time of year to anxiously look forward to all that is anticipated to come in 2014. But it is also the time to look back at all that has happened in 2013. Rather than simply give you links to all of the stimulating...more

NLRB Judge Rules Facebook Chatter Was Concerted Activity, But That Conduct Was Egregious Enough To Justify Employees' Termination

A National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) administrative law judge recently held that while two employees’ Facebook discussions were concerted activity under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA), the particular conduct at...more

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