Protected Concerted Activity Social Media

The phrase "Protected Concerted Activity" refers to certain protected activities specified in the National Labor Relations Act of 1935. Under the NLRA, covered employees may join together to improve... more +
The phrase "Protected Concerted Activity" refers to certain protected activities specified in the National Labor Relations Act of 1935. Under the NLRA, covered employees may join together to improve their wages and working conditions. If employees are engaged in "protected concerted activity" and suffer adverse employment consequences, such employees may seek redress under the NLRA, whether or not they are members of a union.  less -
News & Analysis as of

Blocked: Managing Social Media at Work Under Virginia’s New Privacy Law

With social media pervading all facets of society (no less than 67 percent of Americans are regular users), businesses have long been concerned with their employees’ potentially detrimental social media activities. As these...more

To Follow or Not To Follow … (Social Media in the Workplace—Part 1 of 2)

You’re reading a blog post, and thus need no primer on the prevalence of social media. But you may not be aware of the pitfalls facing employers that use, monitor, or implement policies regarding social media....more

Hold that Friend Request: Legal Traps in a Post-Facebook Work Environment

Many well-meaning managers engage with employees on social media websites, and doing so provides a host of benefits: stronger relationships between employees and management; a sense of collegiality; instant updates on...more

The NLRB Expands Its Reach in the Non-Union Workplace

The National Labor Relations Board continues to infiltrate the workplace even where there are no unions. Standard workplace policies — including those relating to employee conduct, protecting intellectual property, use of...more

What All Employers Can Learn from Ellen Pao’s Resignation from Reddit

You might have been following the latest news on Ellen Pao, the interim CEO of Reddit, who just resigned her position last week. Ms. Pao was also the plaintiff in a high profile sexual harassment lawsuit against her former...more

Five Social Media Law Issues To Discuss With Your Clients

The explosive growth of social media has clients facing legal questions that didn’t even exist a few short years ago. Helping your clients navigate this muddled legal landscape will have them clicking “like” in no...more

Facebook is Not a Picket Line

The National Labor Relations Act protects the rights of employees to connect and address conditions at work, and recent decisions have held that this protection extends to certain work-related conversations on social media....more

Weigand v. N.L.R.B: A Double Standard for Social Media?

On April 17, 2015, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit upheld a National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB” or “Board”) decision finding a local branch of the Amalgamated Transit Union (“Union”) could...more

NLRB Holds Employee’s Obscene Facebook Post Criticizing Supervisor is Protected

We have written previously about the expanding scope of social media activities that the National Labor Relations Act protects and the tight limits the NLRB places on an employer’s ability to discipline employees for...more

NLRB Finds Employee’s Extremely Profane Facebook Post was Protected Concerted Activity

The National Labor Relations Board recently demonstrated how far it will go to protect employees in the name of protected concerted activity. In Pier Sixty, LLC, an employee took to Facebook to call his manager a...more

NLRB rules employee’s vulgar, unprofessional social media post is protected concerted activity

Over the past few years, we’ve warned our employer clients that discipline of employees for social media activity has become risky business. The National Labor Relations Board has taken the position that employee commentary...more

Are You A Nasty Mother Fu*ker?

I don’t know if you are or aren’t. That’s probably for a different (wish I had purchased that domain). However, I do know that your employees apparently can call their manager a nasty...more

Best Practices in Social Media for Employers Part 3 – Disciplining Employees for Conduct on Social Media

As discussed previously (see Best Practices in Social Media for Employers Part 2), adopting a National Labor Relations Act (NLRA)-compliant social media policy is the first step in ensuring that the policy can be enforced. ...more

Workplace Challenges in 2015, Part 2 of 5: Continued Focus on Social Media Policies That the NLRB Will Endorse

During our workplace privacy segment, our presenters, Mintz Levin attorneys Cynthia Larose and Richard Block, and Vice President, Deputy General Counsel of Time, Inc., Michelle Goldstein, addressed several issues that...more

The National Labor Relations Board 2014 Year in Review - Overview of the Board's Significant Actions

Introduction - If the National Labor Relations Board seemed to be on the ropes in 2013, it certainly came out swinging in 2014. Last year, we reported that the Board faced a number of serious legal battles. Although...more

#Insubordination: NLRB Affirms Refusal To Re-Hire Employees Based Upon Facebook Exchange

In prior articles, we have discussed various decisions by the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB” or the “Board”) protecting employee social media activity as concerted activity under Section 7 the National Labor Relations...more

What’s in a Like?

In the pre-Facebook era, the word “like” was primarily a verb (and an interjection sprinkled throughout valley girls’ conversations). Although you could have likes and dislikes in the sense of preferences, you could not give...more

Social Media Policies Revisited: The Facebook “Like” As Protected Activity

The National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) continues to expand its reach beyond its traditional role involving unionized workforces. In particular, the NLRB has continued an aggressive campaign begun in 2011 to crackdown on...more

The NLRB's Latest Digital Developments

Last May, we highlighted a pending National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) case where the Board requested comments on whether it should reconsider its view that employees do not have a statutory right to use employer-owned...more

Firing Employees for Critical Facebook Comments May Be Unlawful

Employers can sometimes lawfully fire employees for posting critical comments about their jobs on social media, even if employees post the comments on their own time and on their own equipment. However, that's not always the...more

NLRB Says "Liking" Another Employee's Facebook Comment is Protected Activity

The National Labor Relations Board continues its line of decisions declaring employee social media use as protected concerted activity under Section 7 of the NLRA. Last month in Triple Play Sports Bar & Grille, the Board...more

When Tech Innovation Outpaces the Law, A Minefield Of Workplace Issues in Social Media

Part of JD Supra's series on innovation and the law. The NLRB has famously struck down employers’ social media policies based on a law that was adopted during the New Deal and has not been amended since....more

Social Media & Protected Activity: Not Always a Third Rail for Employers

The efforts of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) to expand the definition of employee activity protected by section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) and its aggressive prosecution of employers alleged to...more

Latest NLRB Developments Regarding Social Media Policies

Social media on the Internet have become enormously popular in recent years as more and more people log on to chat, blog and post updates on an infinite variety of topics. In response to this phenomenon, many companies have...more

Oh, F*©k No: Administrative Law Judge Rules that Employees’ Expletive-Laced Facebook Posts are not Protected Under the National...

With the increasing prominence of social media, employers have been rightfully concerned about the impact of employees’ out-of-work statements on the work place—particularly when it comes to the reputation of the employer. In...more

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