Social Media Policy National Labor Relations Board

Social Media Policies are organizational personnel policies that outline, often in employee handbooks, acceptable standards for online behavior, as well as ownership and maintenance of organizational social media... more +
Social Media Policies are organizational personnel policies that outline, often in employee handbooks, acceptable standards for online behavior, as well as ownership and maintenance of organizational social media accounts and profiles. The development and enforcement of Social Media Policies can be a controversial issue. For example, some Social Media Policies have been subjected to scrutiny by the National Labor Relations Board for being reasonably interpreted as discouraging "protected concerted activity."  less -
News & Analysis as of

Labor & Employment in 2016: Issues to Watch in the New Year

This year is shaping up to be a dynamic one in labor and employment law. From changes to minimum wage and overtime protections to large-scale Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) investigations, here’s an outline...more

Technology, Guns and the NLRB – Get Ready for 2016

Happy New Year! To help ring in the New Year and pin down last-minute New Year’s resolutions, let’s look at six topics impacting the workplace in 2016...more

Labor and Employment Observer 2015/2016

The Irony in Regulating Employee Social Media Speech: the NLRB vs. the FTC - BREAKING NEWS: Employees use social media. A lot. And, in a related story, Bush beat Gore, according to the Supreme Court. All breaking news,...more

NLRB, Social Media, and Employee Handbooks

Would your company’s employee handbook pass a National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) social media review and investigation? The U.S. Chamber of Commerce highlighted some troubling notions in a report issued last week:...more

Second Circuit “Likes” Where NLRB Shakes Out on Social Media: Finds that Facebook “Likes” and Obscenity-Riddled Posts Were...

A unanimous panel of the Second Circuit recently upheld the NLRB’s well-publicized Facebook “Like” decision, which found that a sports bar violated the National Labor Relations Act when it terminated two employees for...more

Where’s the “Dislike” Button? 2nd Circuit Affirms Employee-Friendly Social Media Ruling

In my last post on HR legalist, I outlined the current state of the law regarding employee social media use. One trend I have been following is the National Labor Relations Board’s expansion of protections for employees who...more

Discipline Based on Social Media Activity – An Update

Social media is no longer trendy. It’s commonplace, and so is discipline imposed because an employee posts something inappropriate. According to a Proskauer survey, 70 percent of employers report taking disciplinary action...more

Social Media Compliance Policies: Your Company Needs One

Use of social media is ubiquitous in today's society. This is astounding when you think back to 2004 and realize that social media did not exist then. Fast forward ten years and by September 2014, 58% of all American adults...more

Second Circuit Affirms NLRB View That Facebook "Likes" Are Protected Concerted Activity

Last week, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals backed the National Labor Relations Board’s position that employee social media postings are protected concerted activity under federal law, even if they use obscenities that...more

[Event] EEOC & NLRB Updates: Important Issues Every Employer Should Know for 2016 - Nov. 17th, Philadelphia, PA

The Labor Relations & Employment Law Department at Obermayer Rebmann Maxwell & Hippel LLP will be hosting an interactive panel discussion covering key issues and trending topics that will impact employers’ practices and...more

Second Circuit Sides With NLRB In Facebook Dispute

As employees continue to flock to social media in droves, employers have been craving additional guidance about how, if at all, they can regulate work-related posts. While it is no secret that employees in unionized and...more

Second Circuit Upholds NLRB's Triple Play Decision, Expanding Section 7 Protections for Employees' Social Media Activity

Obscenities alone—even when viewed by an employer's customers—do not deprive employees engaged in protected concerted activity of the National Labor Relations Act's ("NLRA" or the "Act") protections. So held the U.S. Court...more

Court “Likes” NLRB’s Determination that Facebook Posts Are Protected under the NLRA

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals recently upheld the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) decision that employees’ Facebook posts are protected by the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). Three D, LLC d/b/a Triple Play...more

Second Circuit Upholds NLRB Decision: Discharge of Employees for Facebook “Likes” Was Unlawful

On October 22, 2015, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) decision that Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille (Employer) violated Section 8(a)(1) of the National Labor Relations...more

Second Circuit Says Facebook Profanity Directed at Employer is Protected - Employer Violated NLRA by Terminating Two Employees...

In Three D, LLC d/b/a/ Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille v. NLRB, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit upheld the National Labor Relations Board's (the Board) determination that the employer, Triple Play,...more

The Employment Law Authority - September/October 2015

On October 16, 2015, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) released a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) concerning new rules for extending the Optional Practical Training (OPT) program for international students...more

Dislike Employees’ Facebook “Likes”? Fire Away at Your Own Risk

On October 21, 2015, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the ruling of the National Labor Relations Board (“Board”) decision in Triple Play Sports Bar and Grill, 361 NLRB No. 31 (2014). The employer, Triple Play, had...more

Like It Or Not, Your Employees Can Like It

It gets boring to blog just about the NLRB. We need some judicial action to get the juices flowing a little more. We got a little something last week. Question: Is merely clicking the “like” button on Facebook tantamount to...more

Socially Aware: The Social Media Law Update Volume 6, Issue 4

Five social media law issues to discuss with your clients - The explosive growth of social media has clients facing legal questions that didn’t even exist a few short years ago. Helping your clients navigate this...more

Eight Years Later: Three Big Changes in Employment Law

2007 seems like yesterday. And yet, eight years after I started this blog and over 1800 posts later (and a Hall of Fame entry), I’m pretty sure 2007 WASN’T yesterday. So for this year’s anniversary post, I thought I...more

Dealership Handbooks Remain In The NLRB's Crosshairs

As we advised almost a year ago, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has recently been subjecting dealership handbooks to increased legal scrutiny. Whether or not your dealership is unionized, your employment policies...more

Surprise! NLRB Approves Employer’s Challenged Social Media Policy

In somewhat of a surprise, recently the NLRB affirmed an Administrative Law Judge’s decision, which had rejected the NLRB General Counsel’s challenge to a portion of an employer’s social media policy as unlawful. The...more

Is Your Social Media Policy Overbroad?

The NLRB’s Office of the General Counsel recently published an advice memorandum regarding an employer’s social media policy that provides yet another example of the NLRB’s disapproval of policies that use overbroad language...more

NLRB Continues to Scrutinize Employer Policies - NLRB General Counsel’s Guidance Memorandum and Recent Cases Highlight NLRA Issues

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB or the “Board”) continues to address the scope of permissible employer policies and workplace rules through guidance issued by its General Counsel and in Board decisions. In March...more

NLRB Punishes Employer for Past Unlawful Handbook Policies Despite Employer’s Attempt to Repudiate

In Boch Imports, Inc., the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) found that the employer, a car dealership, violated the National Labor Relations Act because the dealership’s social media and dress code policies were...more

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