Social Media Policy Protected Concerted Activity

Social Media Policies are organizational personnel policies that outline, often in employee handbooks, acceptable standards for online behavior, as well as ownership and maintenance of organizational social media... more +
Social Media Policies are organizational personnel policies that outline, often in employee handbooks, acceptable standards for online behavior, as well as ownership and maintenance of organizational social media accounts and profiles. The development and enforcement of Social Media Policies can be a controversial issue. For example, some Social Media Policies have been subjected to scrutiny by the National Labor Relations Board for being reasonably interpreted as discouraging "protected concerted activity."  less -
News & Analysis as of

Federal ALJ Says NLRA Also Protects Employee Social Media Use from Union Interference

Employers are well aware of the National Labor Relations Board’s increasingly aggressive prosecution of employers accused of violating employee rights by attempting to restrict their social media interactions. Earlier this...more

NLRB Loses Its Lunch Over Chipotle’s Social Media Policy

On August 18, 2016, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) affirmed an administrative law judge’s (ALJ) March 14, 2016 ruling that Chipotle’s “Social Media Code of Conduct” violated the National Labor Relations Act...more

Employer Handbook Policies Violate the National Labor Relations Act

As we recently noted, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) is laser-like focused on scrutinizing employer personnel policies. In yet another example of this ongoing campaign, a recent administrative law judge (ALJ)...more

NLRB Says Employees Spreading Inaccurate Information is Protected Conduct

Yet another chapter in the National Labor Relations Board’s assault on employer social media policies. Earlier this month, the Board rejected Chipotle’s policy that prohibited employees from “posting incomplete, confidential,...more

NLRB Ruling in Social Media Case Provides Useful Guidance for Employers

Drafting a social media policy in compliance with Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA” or “the Act”) has become increasingly challenging for employers, as the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB” or “the...more

Non-Union Employers Have NLRA Risk Too

The National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”) is a federal law governing collective bargaining and protecting the rights of workers to unionize. Because unions are uncommon in Florida outside of the public sector, many private...more

NLRB Tells Employers to Mind their Own Business

Seyfarth Synopsis: An Administrative Law Judge held that an employer’s policy of prohibiting employees from conducting personal business at work, along with its social media and solicitation/distribution policies, violated...more

Guidance On Handbooks, Policies, And Social Media Guidelines – Employers’ Attempts to Protect Themselves Too Much Can Lead to Loss...

Seyfarth Synopsis: The NLRB orders employer to cease and desist from maintaining numerous provisions in its Social Networking Guideline and provisions in the Handbook related to social media, privacy, and confidentiality, and...more

With Your Social Media Policy, It’s “Live” and “Go” Time

Recently, I had the opportunity to revisit a social media policy I had reviewed several years ago. In doing so, I was reminded — once again — how quickly the tech world is changing and how policies need to continually adapt. ...more

The NLRB Continues to Monitor Social Media Policies

According to this EmployNews report, the National Labor Relations Board continues to interpret the National Labor Relations Act to prohibit social media policies that restrict employees’ ability to publically complain about...more

Quirky Question #279: Concerted Activity in 140 Characters or Less

Question: I am a manager in a medium-sized retailer that has locations and employees in 16 states. The company maintains a social media policy, which was recently updated. ...more

Social Media Policy Cannot Prevent Employee from Negative Responses to Customer Tweets

The National Labor Relations Board continues to interpret Section 7 of the NLRA to prevent employers from adopting social media policies that restrict employees’ ability to publically complain about their terms and conditions...more

Legal Risks with Managing Employees in the Social Media Era

Social media continues to be a growing platform for applicants, employees, and employers to use for marketing, company branding, and employee engagement. As with any computer technology, the use of social media in the...more

NLRB Continues to Target Employers’ Social Media Policies

In recent years, the National Labor Relations Board has placed increasing scrutiny on employers’ social media policies. The NLRB has specifically focused on whether such policies unlawfully interfere with employees’ right...more

Is Tweeting A Protected Concerted Activity?

According to the NLRB’s recent ruling in Chipotle Servs. LLC, 2016 BL 76781, tweeting can be a protected activity. In that decision, the presiding ALJ determined that Chipotle violated the NLRA when it directed an employee to...more

Personal Gripes v. Protected Concerted Activity: Where To Draw The Line Regarding An Employee’s Job-Related Complaint On Social...

threshold questionBy now, many people have heard about the Yelp/Eat24 employee who published a rant last month on social media platform Medium addressed to Company CEO Jeremy Stoppelman relating to how her entry-level...more

It’s Still The Relationships, Stupid – 2015 Wrap Up (Part 2 of 2)

It is this time every year, as I am wrapping things up over at “social media and employment law blog” central, – and particularly in this latest political election year – that I am reminded of that election campaign more than...more

Where’s the “Dislike” Button? 2nd Circuit Affirms Employee-Friendly Social Media Ruling

In my last post on HR legalist, I outlined the current state of the law regarding employee social media use. One trend I have been following is the National Labor Relations Board’s expansion of protections for employees who...more

Discipline Based on Social Media Activity – An Update

Social media is no longer trendy. It’s commonplace, and so is discipline imposed because an employee posts something inappropriate. According to a Proskauer survey, 70 percent of employers report taking disciplinary action...more

Second Circuit Affirms NLRB View That Facebook "Likes" Are Protected Concerted Activity

Last week, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals backed the National Labor Relations Board’s position that employee social media postings are protected concerted activity under federal law, even if they use obscenities that...more

Second Circuit Sides With NLRB In Facebook Dispute

As employees continue to flock to social media in droves, employers have been craving additional guidance about how, if at all, they can regulate work-related posts. While it is no secret that employees in unionized and...more

Second Circuit Upholds NLRB's Triple Play Decision, Expanding Section 7 Protections for Employees' Social Media Activity

Obscenities alone—even when viewed by an employer's customers—do not deprive employees engaged in protected concerted activity of the National Labor Relations Act's ("NLRA" or the "Act") protections. So held the U.S. Court...more

Court “Likes” NLRB’s Determination that Facebook Posts Are Protected under the NLRA

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals recently upheld the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) decision that employees’ Facebook posts are protected by the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). Three D, LLC d/b/a Triple Play...more

Second Circuit Upholds NLRB Decision: Discharge of Employees for Facebook “Likes” Was Unlawful

On October 22, 2015, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) decision that Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille (Employer) violated Section 8(a)(1) of the National Labor Relations...more

Second Circuit Says Facebook Profanity Directed at Employer is Protected - Employer Violated NLRA by Terminating Two Employees...

In Three D, LLC d/b/a/ Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille v. NLRB, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit upheld the National Labor Relations Board's (the Board) determination that the employer, Triple Play,...more

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