Termination Social Media

News & Analysis as of

Will the Second Circuit “Like” the NLRB’s Recent Stance on Social Media? An Update on the Facebook “Like” Firing Case

The NLRB last week filed its brief at the Second Circuit Court of Appeals in the well-publicized Facebook “Like” firing case, Three D, LLC v. NLRB. Prior to the appeal, we discussed the NLRB’s August 2014 ruling here as part...more

Sacking UK Employee for Inappropriate Tweets May be a “Fair” Dismissal Under UK Law

In the recent case of Game Retail Limited v Laws, the UK Employment Appeal Tribunal (or “EAT“) considered the fairness of an employee’s dismissal for offensive tweets. This is the first time this issue has been considered at...more

Facebooker–Good Citizen or Fired?

Can an employee’s Facebook post be grounds for termination? The Fifth Circuit says, “Yes.” Graziosi v. City of Greenville Mississippi, No. 13-60900 (5th Cir. January 9, 2015). A police officer posted on her Facebook page and...more

Can Offensive Personal Tweets Justify Dismissal?

Most of the case law in the UK on dismissals related to employees' social media activity has been at employment tribunal level and therefore the recent decision of the Employment Appeal Tribunal (“EAT”) in Game Retail v Laws...more

NLRB Says On-Line Planning For Insubordination Is Not Protected Concerted Activity

In Richmond District Neighborhood Center, Case 20-CA-091748 (Oct. 28, 2014), the Board upheld an Administrative Law Judge’s ruling that a conversation between two employees, who were involved with student programming at the...more

NLRB Upholds Employee Terminations for Facebook Rant

A few weeks ago, I wrote a blog post about the recent line of NLRB cases examining what constitutes “protected, concerted” activity in the context of employees engaging in profane, insulting, or disrespectful conduct or talk...more

Social Media Defies Traditional Evidence Collection and Review Techniques

Traditional e-discovery collection tools are not designed to work with social media, and manual techniques are too time consuming to be workable, as a plaintiff learned in a recent wrongful termination case, Stallings v. City...more

NLRB “Unfriends” Employer Over Facebook “Like”

On August 25, the National Labor Relations Board found in Three D, LLC, d/b/a Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille v. Sanzone, Case No. 34-CA-012915, and Three D, LLC, d/b/a Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille v. Spinella, Case...more

There is Such a Thing as Over-Sharing: Former Employee Forfeits Portion of Settlement Payment After Daughter Discloses Settlement...

It seems like every day there is a new case highlighting novel and evolving issues employers confront when people disclose information via social media. The latest example involves a hapless college-age daughter in Florida...more

Facebook: Fireable Offense or Free Speech?

The interplay between an employee’s postings on Facebook and the impact of those postings on his or her employment status is an evolving area of the law. Just last month, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of...more

Social Media & Non-Competition Clauses

In our earlier post (Are Non-Competition Restrictions Enforceable?), we reviewed “restrictive covenants” - these are clauses under which employees are bound by restrictions such as non-competition restrictions,...more

Some Firings Based on Social Media Use May Be Okay

In early November, an administrative law judge of the National Labor Relations Board dismissed a complaint filed against an employer, finding that the employer did not violate the National Labor Relations Act by withdrawing...more

First Amendment Does Not Prevent State From Firing Employee For Derogatory Facebook Comments

Though the First Amendment affords greater free speech protections for government employees relative to those in the private sector, the speakers do not have carte blanche to insult or deride whomever they see fit. Rather,...more

The Social Media Merry-Go-Round

I have posted before about National Labor Relations Board (NLRB)’s interest in social media, in several cases where employees were fired or disciplined after posting messages on social media sites critical of their employer...more

New Jersey District Court Holds That Stored Communications Act Protects Employee’s Private Facebook Posts, But Employer Still Free...

In Ehling v. Monmouth-Ocean Hospital Service Corp., No. 2:11-cv-03305-WJM-MF (D.N.J. Aug. 20, 2013), a registered nurse was fired after her employer viewed several of her controversial private Facebook posts. In a matter of...more

Say What? Terminated Employees ‘Own’ Their LinkedIn Accounts (and the Company’s Trade Secrets)?

Companies are getting a big surprise these days: Employees are leaving with their LinkedIn accounts and the company’s proprietary list of business contacts. LinkedIn is a well-known, business-oriented social media website...more

Employer Merely Granted Employee’s Wish To Be Terminated, NLRB Div. Of Advice Rules

Social media permeates society. It was inevitable that the increased use of smart phones and various communications platforms such as Facebook and Twitter would clash with the workplace. We have noted several instances where...more

Workplace Policy Institute: Social Media Password Protection and Privacy — The Patchwork of State Laws and How It Affects...

Introduction - Social media websites such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and others have become a part of daily life in the United States and abroad. The unavoidable reach of social media into our personal lives has...more

Employment Law Lessons From Chicken And Rice

Let’s first dispense with the opening hook by asking: Was Rutgers University acting “chicken” when it (finally?) chose to fire Coach Mike Rice only after public outrage over events that took place last year? Whether or not...more

The "Employee Tricked Me Into Firing Her" Defense

The NLRB continues to issue decisions about whether an employer can lawfully terminate employees based on social media activity, and whether workplace policies violate the law protecting employees’ rights to engage in...more

Employment Law Newsletter: April 2013

Post-Brinker Meal Break Decisions on Class Certification De-Published by California Supreme Court - We have previously reported on the California Supreme Court’s decision in Brinker Restaurant Corp. v....more

Twitter: Employee Who Complained about Sexual Harassment via Twitter Fired

Adria Richards is a self-described “endlessly enthusiastic technology evangelist.” While attending a large technology conference in Santa Clara, California, Ms. Richards overheard two men sitting behind her making a series...more

Facebook Postings Showing Misuse of FMLA Leave Can Form Sufficient Legal Basis of Termination

Based on the number of social media decisions from the National Labor Relations Board over the past two years, most employers understand that when employee Facebook postings constitute “protected activity” under the National...more

Tweet, Follow, Or Get Out Of The Way: What All Employers Need To Know About Social Media In The Workplace

Facebook. Twitter. LinkedIn. YouTube. Blogs. Email. Texts. Social media in the workplace has become a fact of life for all employers. Companies are learning that these once feared social media sites can be powerful marketing...more

NLRB Orders Reinstatement of Employees Fired Over Discussion on Facebook

In Hispanics United of Buffalo, Inc., 359 NLRB No. 37 (Dec. 14, 2012), the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) found that an employer violated section 8(a)(1) of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) by firing five...more

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